Estimates of elasticities for food demand in the United States
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Estimates of elasticities for food demand in the United States

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Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service in [Washington] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Food consumption

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJitendar S. Mann, George E. St. George
SeriesTechnical bulletin - Dept. of Agriculture ; no. 1580, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 1580
ContributionsSt. George, George E., joint author, United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 11 p. ;
Number of Pages11
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14837834M

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Estimates of elasticities for food demand in the United States. Washington: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, (OCoLC) This database is no longer being updated. The Commodity and Food Elasticities Database is a collection of elasticities from research on consumer demand published in working papers, dissertations, and peer-reviewed journals and as presented at professional conferences in the United States. Most of the literature is from U.S. academic and government research. Downloadable! Various estimates of quantity-and price-dependent demand equations for total food demand are made. The regression coefficients are used to derive estimates of price and income elasticities and flexibilities. The results indicate that response of food demand to price and income changes is low compared with estimates in previous studies. Downloadable! Many findings and policy recommendations in the academic literature are influenced by published estimates of elasticities of demand for food. However, the quality of these estimates is diverse and depends on modeling choices and assumptions, including the functional form for demands, types of data used, separability structure, food defi nitions, and statistical techniques used to Cited by:

Get this from a library! Demand for food in the United States: a review of literature, evaluation of previous estimates, and presentation of new estimates of demand. [Abigail Mary Okrent; Julian M Alston; Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics.] -- "Many findings and policy recommendations in the academic literature are influenced by published estimates of elasticities of demand for food. Estimates and Determinants of Armington Elasticities for the U.S. Food Industry Article in Journal of Industry Competition and Trade 2(3) September with 22 Reads How we measure 'reads'. THE INCREASING BURDEN OF diet-related chronic diseases has prompted policymakers and researchers to explore broad-based approaches to improving diets. 1,2 One way to address the issue is to change the relative prices of selected foods through carefully designed tax or subsidy policies. The potential of price changes to improve food choices is evident from growing research on how relative Cited by: Mutti, J. “The Specification of Demand Equations for Imports and Domestic Substitutes.” Southern Economic Journal 44 (1)– Reinert, K., and D.W. Roland-Holst. “Armington Elasticities for United States Manufacturing Sectors.” Journal of Policy Modeling 14 (5)–

The National Food Survey reports estimates of elasticities of demand using Family Food data. The approach it uses to estimate these elasticities is now recognised to be outdated from both an economic and statistical point of view. Overcoming these short-comings, this project provides a set of new food demand elasticities that give informationFile Size: 1MB. Practice Questions and Answers from Lesson I Elasticity The following questions practice these skills: Use the midpoint method for calculating percent change. Compute price elasticity of demand. Identify elastic and inelastic demand according to the price elasticity of Size: KB.   Stone, Joe A., “Price Elasticities of Demand for Imports and Exports: Industry Estimates for the U.S., the EEC and Japan”.Review of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 61, , pp. – CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: Table 5 shows estimated price elasticities of demand for a variety of consumer goods and services. Over the long run, the demand for automobiles in rural areas would probably be inelastic, since there are few alternative modes of transportation. Table 5 includes an estimate for the price elasticity of demand of for alternative schools File Size: 25KB.